Blog, News & Offers


Why should I try contact lenses?

Posted on 14 April 2021


Why should I try contact lenses?

Some people can find the idea of wearing contact lenses daunting others take to them like a duck to water. Unlike some practices who only sell a limited range, our trained Opticians can find the best option for you, not just the best in a small portfolio. We are all different after all. Time of wear, hobbies, sports, occupation aswell as budget all need to be taken into consideration when choosing the right lenses for any wearer.

So, Why should you try contact lenses in 2021

1. Clear, crisp vision.
Contact lenses give you a full field of focussed vision wherever you look. For some prescription types, contact lens wear is the only way to achieve a higher level of vision.

2. Lenses are comfortable, safe, simple and easy to use, we will teach you everything you need to put them in and out and look after them and your eyes. Dont worry, if it takes 5 lessons (it wont) we will be there.

3. Improved Appearance
Personally i love my specs, but i know glasses wear isnt for everyone. Contact lenses can improve how you see yourself giving better self esteem and how others see you. So long Mr/Mrs Shy, Hello confident new you.

4. Lifestyle
Freedom to lead an active lifestyle including sports, leisure and outdoor activities.

5. No Fogging
In these times of mask wearing contact lenses can greatly improve your visual comfort

Contact lens trials are free so what have you got to lose? Call now to make an appointment to see what contact lenses can do for you!


 Learn More 

Polarised sunspecs

Posted on 01 April 2021


Polarised sunspecs
Polarised sunspecs

With the summer around the corner and the chance of having a holiday this year on the cards, you may be looking to invest in a new pair of sunglasses. And a tint is a tint right? Wrong. There are loads of different types of materials and technology out there with a range of optical properties.

My personal favourite are Polarising lenses, but even within this market, they are not all alike with some having more advantages than others. Xperio are my personal favourite and since having my first pair, i have never tolerated a standard pair of tinted sunspecs ever again.

First of all let’s dispel the Jargon:

What does Polarised mean?
Light waves travel in many directions. When light waves reflect off of horizontal surfaces such as roads, water or ice they (the light beams) become concentrated horizontally. This is seen as visible glare, which can be uncomfortable for our eyes and potentially dangerous especially when driving as you may miss a hazard or be too blinded to keep your eyes open. This type of glare is not eliminated by regularly tinted lenses, a standard tint just lowers the intensity of the glare.
Lenses with Polarised technology allow only vertical directed light beams through the lens and therefore eliminate blinding glare for optimal visual comfort and safety. If your into your fishing you would have already at least heard about this form of lens, rather than see the water like a mirror you see straight into it seeing any of the fish below the surface, oh and rocks you may trip over.
In a nut shell, its the best lens form for drivers (no glare from road, no reflections of dashboard), anyone who spends time around water, snow or sand. Perfect for everyday use and even more so when on holiday.

And what is Xperio?
There are loads of polarising lenses on the market which in a nutshell all block out these horizontal light waves, but when you take light away you lose colour perception and clarity. This is where Xperio differs, this technology enhances colour perception. Xperio Polarised combines the 2 technologies; eliminates harsh, blinding glare and provides a pop making colours still stand out for a dynamic range of visual experience. This is achieved by improving colour perception and stopping dazzling light to travelling through the lens. Xperio also offers the highest level of UV protection meaning optimum ocular health properties too.

What are they available in?
This technology is available in both single vision (including no power) and various Varifocal designs meaning we can match them to your everyday lenses. The lenses can be made thinner and lighter if your prescription is higher.

There not just available in Grey and Brown colours either, we have loads of colours they can be made in and they can be made with a mirror finish too.


 Learn More 

How can pregnancy effect your vision?

Posted on 01 April 2021


How can pregnancy effect your vision?

Many changes that happen during pregnancy are well-known and recognised, such as food cravings, swollen feet, morning sickness and mood swings. However, how many of you knew that your vision could be affected too?
Whether you are pregnant or you are thinking about becoming pregnant, it’s important that you are aware of the changes your body could go through over the upcoming 9 months.

Pregnancy can change your hormone levels, which can affect many parts of your body as your baby grows. A fluctuation in your hormones can result in slightly impaired vision; however, it is important to note that most women find their vision returns to normal after giving birth.

If you are concerned about your eyesight during your pregnancy, it is important to visit your local optician just to make sure there are no underlying problems.

Hormones during pregnancy can change the quality of your vision for a number of reasons as your body goes through a multitude of changes. Usually these changes are temporary; your optician may advise avoiding any corrective eye surgery or changing your lens prescription.

Here are some of the vision changes you may experience during pregnancy.

DRY EYES

Your hormones during pregnancy may cause dry eyes, due to a change in the quality and amount of tear production in your eye. You might experience symptoms such as excessive tearing, intermittent blurry vision or a scratchy, burning sensation.

This happens because the lubricating glands on the upper and lower eyelid margins produce less oil to keep your eyes moist. You can usually treat this problem with eye drops which are safe to use during pregnancy. All of our practices have staff trained in ocular hygiene and can discuss which dry eye products are suitable for you during pregnancy.

REFRACTIVE ERRORS

Pregnancy can sometimes change how your eyes refract light, meaning you may have trouble seeing objects in the distance, causing short-sightedness. This is due to water retention which can thicken the cornea and alter the surface of your eye.

If the changes are only minor, it is recommended that you wait until you have given birth to see if a change in prescription is necessary, unless you are happy that a change in specs may only be a temporary fix. However, you should still see an optician to make sure your vision problems aren’t being caused by any other issues.

As well as water retention affecting your cornea, you may experience puffy eyes.

MIGRAINE HEADACHES

Some women may find they experience lots of headaches, which is more common in early pregnancy. This can be liked to hormonal changes and may result in sensitivity to light. It is important that you check with your doctor before taking migraine medication.

You may also benefit from minimising your exposure to light during a migraine headache, either by wearing sunglasses or turning the lights down.

Headaches can sometimes be a symptom of pre-eclampsia, as can blurred vision or seeing flashing lights.

NOTICING CHANGES IN YOUR VISION DURING PREGNANCY

Any changes in your eyesight should always be checked by a medical professional. Sometimes vision problems can provide warning signs of more serious conditions during pregnancy, such as the aforementioned pre-eclampsia, or high blood pressure.

If you have diabetes, pregnancy could worsen any pre-existing eye disease such as diabetic retinopathy. You may develop gestational diabetes, which can flare up during pregnancy and disappears after childbirth, which can cause blurry vision.

By being able to recognise any changes in your vision, your optician can advise on the best treatment to help until you have given birth and after. It is important to eat well and keep yourself hydrated, particularly through pregnancy, to give yourself the best chance of good eye health.


 Learn More 

Eyesight issues during lockdown

Posted on 04 March 2021


Eyesight issues during lockdown

The last nine months have changed how everyone lives their lives, from working from home to organising home-schooling. It has presented us with new challenges to face as we adjust to lockdowns and restrictions, and our habits have undoubtedly changed drastically.
According to a survey carried out by Fight for Sight, one such change has led to an increased time using digital screens. Many of us are now communicating with colleagues, customers and friends via video calls, texts and emails more than ever before. Coupled with less of us going for an eye exam due to the pandemic, there’s an increased risk of experiencing eyesight issues during the lockdown.

A Fight for Sight report found results from a YouGov poll, demonstrating an increase in screen time and its impact on vision. 49% of respondents said their screen time had increased since the pandemic began, with 21% stating they were less likely to attend an eye test, for fear of catching or spreading the virus.

CAN INCREASED SCREEN TIME AFFECT YOUR VISION?

Focusing on anything close-up for a long time, such as laptops, tablets, or smartphones, can result in discomfort better known as Computer Vision Syndrome. A third of those surveyed believed their eyesight has worsened through lockdown, with some experiencing migraines, difficulty reading and poorer night vision.

Looking at a screen all day can result in eye fatigue. After just 20 minutes of looking at a nearby object, our visual ability weakens and can result in headaches, neck pain or blurry vision. Our eyes must continuously refocus each time digital screens refresh, making our eyes work even harder to see clearly.

Research has now shown that increased screen time or time focusing on near targets during childhood can increase the chances of becoming short sighted (myopic) during their developmental years. This means they are more likely to have associated sight conditions later in life as well as needing spectacles or Contact lenses to see clearly. If already Myopic, increased screen time can encourage further and more rapid progression of the overall power of lenses needed.

Attending regular eye examinations is one of the best ways to ensure your vision isn’t deteriorating, and your optician can also look out for other health problems during a routine test. Opticians are still open in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, offering routine examinations and urgent care.

HOW TO PREVENT EYE STRAIN

You can protect your vision and reduce the risk of eyesight issues in several ways. Firstly, consider the 20-20-20 rule throughout your day. Every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. This can help your eyes to rest momentarily from close-up work.

However, there are long term solutions available to support your vision from prolonged screen use. Eyezen lenses are single vision lenses designed to prevent and reduce eye strain. You can also wear Eyezen lenses if you don’t have a prescription. These lenses have your usual prescription in the distance and intermediate areas of the lens with a relaxation zone built in for areas of the lens your eye would look through to see closer objects like keyboards, tablets and phones. Just think, our visual habits have changed even when watching the Tv many of us are also intermittently looking at our phones fatiguing the eyes further.

Many people need varifocals to see clearly at different distances, but these lenses are for general day to day use and are not necessarily designed to give comfortable viewing for specific prolonged tasks. The usual portion of a lens dedicated to computer distances is about 1/5th and is situated in the lower half of the lens, this mean people have to adopt head postures like raising their chin to see clearly or accept blurred vision therefore making the eyes work harder. Occupational lenses can be made to match a workspace or hobby's visual requirements as an additional or sole pair of spectacles to go alongside an all round solution like a traditional varifocal or single vision distance lens. Some people need to focus on objects just within a 1metre bubble, others up to 2m and so on. We don't just read these days, we look at near objects like phones, tablets, paper and computer screens all at near but at different distances which therefore need slightly different powers to see not only clearly but comfortably These lenses can be purpose built based on the users requirements. Our Opticians would do a near task analysis to determine what design template would suit your needs best.

So, if you’re working on your laptop, catching up with friends on a video call or gaming on a console, protect and prolong your vision with the right lenses. And dont worry although these lenses are much more complicated than single vision they are not much more in cost and come with coatings as standard.

BLINK!

Dry eye issues are on the rise during the lockdowns. Dry eyes can make the eye feel tired, strained and aching.
More time spent indoors, reduced hydration due to mask wearing in work places, masks forcing warm air up into the eyes and people not blinking whilst staring at screens are all to blame. Remember, tears are distributed across the surface of the eye every time we blink. Speak to our ocular hygienists in practice to discuss products that can relieve these symptoms. If you are shielding we will happily discuss your needs over he phone and deliver products to you.

BLUE LIGHT

Blue light has a proven association with increased eye strain and fatigue as well as being linked to inhibiting sleep. Blue light is produced by most electronic devises. Coatings can be applied to spectacle lenses to block this blue light out but it can also be reduced by adjusting your electronic device settings. Phones may call it night mode due to its promotion of better sleep. When blue light is removed white appears more yellow and warmer. Simple changes like these can improve visual comfort throughout your day and evening.


 Learn More 

HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR GLASSES

Posted on 04 March 2021


HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR GLASSES

For anyone who wears glasses, you have no doubt experienced smudges and bothersome marks on the lenses at some point. Blemishes on your lenses can be distracting, especially if trying to read, watch television or drive. Whether you are new to glasses or are just looking for a better way to keep them clean and protected, here is some advice to help you take care of your glasses.

HOW TO PROPERLY CLEAN YOUR GLASSES AND LENSES

Cleaning your glasses can be just as important as washing your hands. After all, you probably touch your lenses multiple times a day, and you might even take them off and put them down on surfaces. Videos showing life hacks suggest some pretty unusual ways to clean specs including steaming, cleaning with tooth paste and certain chemical products. But beware, many lenses have coatings which are sensitive to some of these methods being used and with repeat exposure can cause the lens to craze (look like a dried up river bed)

In practice we use a lens spray with the perfect solution for cleaning lenses without causing damage to the coatings. As part of our Eco project we are giving away bottles with this solution that you can have free refills to save the plastic bottle.

Alternatively, the safest and easiest way to clean your glasses and lenses is to use warm water and a little bit of pH-neutral soap. Apply the mixture gently across the frame and lenses using your finger and thumb. Be sure to clean the parts of the frame that come into contact with your face, as this will remove any skin oils and dirt.

To dry your glasses, use a soft cleaning cloth, like the one that comes with your lenses. Try to avoid paper towels or facial tissue. And its a no, don't use the underside of your t-shirt or jumper.

For day-to-day cleaning, you can simply wipe your lenses with an optical cloth. If you would like a more thorough cleaning procedure, ask your local practice for an ultrasonic cleaning service.


HOW TO PREVENT YOUR GLASSES FROM SCRATCHING

Our glasses can go through a lot in one day! It's essential to keep them out of harm's way to avoid scratches. Try to get into the habit of keeping your glasses in a case when you are not wearing them. You should avoid leaving your glasses lens-down on surfaces too.

If you'd like to protect your lenses even further, you should complete your glasses with a scratch-resistant lens coating. Crizal coatings are covered by a two-year scratch guarantee* so that you can enjoy clear vision every day with peace of mind.

How to stop your lenses from smudging

Similarly, you might often notice smudging on your lenses; most likely from your fingers catching the lens as you pick up your glasses or take them on and off. Wiping your lenses daily with an optical cloth can help remove most smudges. Try to avoid leaving your glasses in potentially messy places such as the kitchen. Sometimes dirt can be in the rims of the frame and when cleaning the specs the dirt from this area is moved onto the lens. An ultrasonic clean removes this dirt as well as a clean with a cotton wool bud around the rim.

Crizal lens coatings can also help to provide a smudge and dirt-resistant layer for your lenses, making them easier to clean and look after.


 Learn More 

Diabetes and sight loss

Posted on 16 February 2021


Diabetes and sight loss
Diabetes and sight loss

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of preventable sight loss in the UK. By recognising the signs of the eye conditions associated with diabetes, you can prevent future problems with your vision and eye health.

WHAT EFFECT DOES DIABETES HAVE ON YOUR EYES?

The changes in your blood sugar levels, caused by diabetes, can often affect many parts of your body and how you feel, this includes the lens inside your eye. Changes in your blood sugar levels can make your vision blurry, this can change throughout the day and even day to day as your levels fluctuate.
If recently diagnosed as diabetic or recently started treatment we may decline performing a sight test as these changes in the eyes lens can produce a spectacle prescription on the day which may have changed by the time you come to collect your new specs.

If you have diabetes, you might also be at higher risk of certain eye conditions when compared to others without diabetes; this can include cataracts, glaucoma and retinopathy.

DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

Diabetic retinopathy is directly related to diabetes and occurs when there is damage to the blood vessels in the eye. Over time, diabetes can affect the blood vessels supplying the retina of your eye due to high blood sugar levels, affecting how it works. There are different types of retinopathy, with each type progressing in stages. There are many signs we look for during assessment of the eye. Some of these are shown on the photo above and include; Haemorrhages (leaked blood vessels), Abnormal growth of blood vessels (similar to AMD, can burst leaking fluid), Aneurism (bulge of blood in weak wall of blood vessel, can leak), Cotton wool spots (Damage to the nerve fibre layers) and Hard exudates (blockage causing fats and proteins to leak into retina). Someone with diabetic retinopathy may have a combination of the above clinical signs present with varying effects on their vison.

Diabetic retinopathy doesn’t usually present noticeable symptoms because the condition is gradual. If you have had diabetes for a long time, or your blood sugar levels and blood pressure are high, you can be at higher risk.

The effects noticed will be of sporadic patches missing in a personal visual field or peripheral vision. If central vision is effected they would have Diabetic Maculopathy as it effects the central Macular rather than peripheral retina.
The picture above is an example of how someone with a few areas effected in their eyes might see.

Treatment is available for diabetic retinopathy, with several different options depending on which stage the condition has reached. Your eye care professional will be able to advise on a case by case basis. These include laser treatments to contain damage within a “wall” created by a laser to injections into the eye similar to those for AMD.
In all cases, the better the diabetes is managed the better the outcome on vision is likely to be.

CATARACTS AND DIABETES

Cataracts are a common eye condition in people aged 65 or over and usually develop gradually over the years. As diabetes can affect the lens of your eye, being diabetic can increase your chances of developing cataracts. You may find that you contract cataracts at an earlier age than expected.

When you have cataracts, the lens in your eye gradually becomes cloudy and impairs your vision. It is not painful, but it can cause symptoms like blurry vision, faded colours, double vision, or seeing a halo effect when looking at lights.

You can undergo cataract surgery to fix this, which is a very straightforward operation. It is one of the most common procedures in the UK.

GLAUCOMA AND DIABETES

If you have diabetes, you may be more likely to develop glaucoma. Glaucoma happens when there is a build-up of pressure in the eye, which can lead to damage around the retina or optic nerve if not treated.

Symptoms of glaucoma are not always noticeable but can include eye pain, redness, headaches and misty vision. Those with diabetes have a higher risk of developing glaucoma, but it can be easily treated if found early enough. You can see our other blog for more information on Glaucoma.

REDUCING YOUR RISK OF EYE DISEASE IF YOU HAVE DIABETES

The most important thing you can do to protect your overall health is to keep your diabetes under control as best you can to reduce your risk of many different health complications, including eye diseases. You should closely monitor your blood sugar levels, blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Maintaining a healthy weight and keeping fit is also essential to reduce your risk of eye disease. Poor diet and other similar lifestyle choices can trigger many eye conditions. Quitting smoking, or not taking up smoking in the first place, is also very important for everyone’s health but particularly if you have diabetes. Smoking can increase your blood pressure and may raise your blood sugar levels.

EYE SCREENING

If you have diabetes, the NHS offers an annual diabetic eye screening service for those aged 12 and above as well as free sight tests on either an annual or biannual basis depending on your age or health of your eyes. It is crucial that you attend regular sight test appointments as well as going to your screening, as they can detect diabetic retinopathy in your eyes before your vision is affected.
The screening DOES NOT look for any other issues with your eyes such as Glasses prescriptions, Corneal health, Macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataracts as well as many more. In a nut shell that service are only looking for diabetic changes. We are able to offer screening in our non Staffordshire practices, sadly the funding for Opticians to perform screenings in Staffordshire has ended so you will be called to a mobile screening location and given a designated date and time if you are registered with a GP in this area.

Covid 19 has had an effect on Diabetic screening creating a large backlog. The diabetic services have looked at historic data to see which patients have consistent healthy screenings and as a one off due to pandemic these patients will skip a year and be seen in 2021. Any new diabetics or people with historic issues who are being monitored more carefully will still be seen.
If you have diabetes and have noticed a change in your vision you should not wait for your screening, its most likely a change in prescription but it could be something more serious, book a free sight test to make sure.

As with all sight impacting conditions there is an ever changing landscape of low vision devices and support groups to help assist a person suffering with sight loss.
Our final blog of the month will be about the latest tech on the market that can assist someone with serious sight loss.


 Learn More 

Glaucoma awareness, what is it and how does it affect the eye?

Posted on 09 February 2021


Low vision awareness month; Glaucoma.

Glaucoma, What is it and how does it effect sight?

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that affect the optic nerve, the nerve which connects the eye to the brain. The damage is caused by an increase in pressure inside the eye (intra ocular pressure or IOP).
It often affects both eyes, usually to varying degrees. It affects the most peripheral vision first gradually working its way to the central vision area and for that reason the effects often go unnoticed until it can be quite advanced. In most cases it is asymptomatic and is hence know as a silent blinder of sight conditions. It is treatable but best managed if detected early, something which can be done through a routine eye test.

What causes Glaucoma?

Inside the eye, a continuous production of fluid occurs called the aqueous humour. This fluid has a very important job of maintaining the shape of the eye as well as keeping the back of the eye pressed down so it can function correctly. Normally as new fluid is produced, old fluid makes its way to drainage tubes where it leaves the eye. In glaucoma this drainage is damaged or blocked somewhere along the fluids pathway causing a build up of fluid and an increase in pressure. Imagine a sink with the tap on, glaucoma is either the plug being closed or partially closed or the pipes under the sink being blocked.

There are 2 main subtypes of glaucoma, Chronic and Acute.

Chronic is the most common type which develops very slowly. It is painless and will effect the vision slowly from the outside in and therefore needs detecting through a sight test.
Acute Glaucoma is painful and has a sudden onset due to a rapid increase in IOP. The pain is usually extreme and not something you may ignore with blurred vision and halo’s around light also noticed. In this instance you should go immediately to a hospital with an eye A+E department. In our practice areas this would be Burton Queens, Birmingham City or Wolverhampton New cross hospitals.
In my earlier comparison, Chronic glaucoma is either the plug being slightly covered or the pipes being slightly blocked so the water doesn’t run away quite as efficiently, Acute is where the plug is in or the pipes are blocked so the sink fills with water and has nowhere to go.

The most common types are:
• Primary open angle glaucoma, the most common type of glaucoma in the UK. It’s also known as chronic open angle glaucoma which means the damage to your optic nerve and changes to your sight happen very slowly over time.

• Closed angle glaucoma, where damage to the optic nerve can happen very quickly due to a sudden rise in eye pressure.

• Normal tension glaucoma, when an eye pressure within the normal range still causes damage to the optic nerve.

• Secondary glaucoma, which occurs as a result of another eye condition, an injury to the eye or due to medication.

• Congenital glaucoma, when a baby is born with glaucoma.

What factors increase your risk?

Risk factors for glaucoma include:
• increasing age,
• high pressure in the eye,
• a family history of glaucoma,
• being short sighted (myopic)
• use of steroid medication.
You are also at increased risk of developing chronic glaucoma if you are of black-African or black-Caribbean origin, whereas people of Asian origin are more at risk of getting acute glaucoma compared with those from other ethnic groups.
Because Family history is such an important risk factor, anyone over the age of 40 directly related to someone with glaucoma can have NHS sight tests, either every 12 months or 2 years depending on what is found on the sight test.

Testing for glaucoma.

Eye pressure test (tonometry)

An instrument called a tonometer is used to measure the pressure inside your eye – intraocular pressure. Tonometry can be useful to identify ocular hypertension (OHT – raised pressure in the eye). In some opticians this device produces a puff of air into the eye. In all of our practices we have non puff tonometer’s.

Visual field test

By staring straight at a central light/target throughout, You will be shown a sequence of lights and asked to respond by pressing a button when you notice a light flash in your peripheral vision. If you can’t see the spots in your peripheral vision, it may indicate the glaucoma has damaged part of that area of vision.

Optic nerve assessment

Your optic nerve connects your eye to your brain. This can be assessed in a variety of ways during your examination. We are interested in the cup to disc ratio or in other words the size it is round by how deep it appears like a tea cup. Too much pressure forces to cup to become deeper.

OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography)

OCT scans are similar to MRI and ultrasound scans and can help opticians detect signs of glaucoma and other conditions up to four years earlier than more traditional imaging methods. The scan produces a 3D-like image that allows us to see the structures of your eye in even greater detail. Over time, your optician will be able to spot the changes that indicate the start of glaucoma. Ask your local store if they offer OCT and you can add it to your eye test for an additional fee.

Treatment

Glaucoma cannot be cured but in many cases it can be managed to slow the progression to avoid glaucomatous damage and nerve damage, which will preserve the visual field and provide total quality of life for patients, with minimal side-effects. Sadly however there are some people less fortunate or those with rarer strains of the condition who are left visually impaired.

Glaucoma can be treated:
• Medication; Using eye drops to either help the flow of fluid in the eye or slow its production.
• Laser; Laser can be used to create a hole allowing fluid to leave the eye or to remove a source of blockage in effect.
• Surgery; Implants can be put in to bisect a blocked area.

Low vision considerations

Ophthalmologists can refer patients with low vision caused by any eye condition to a low vision clinic where assessments can be conducted to determine if any devises can improve everyday life for someone living with an eye condition. With glaucoma the peripheral vision is damaged first leaving the central area of vision functional or partially functional.
To empathise how this would feel close one eye and look through a toilet roll tube or tube made from your fist.

Spectacle lenses are designed to focus light entering the eye as sharply as possible into the back of the eye. They unfortunately cannot be used to improve lost field of vision, only make the image as sharp as possible on the non damaged area's.

Low vision therapy can be anything from teaching someone how to use their functional areas of vision to the use of telescopes or magnifiers to ensure an image falls on the functional area of vision. Low vision aids can be quite expensive so these are loaned to patients from the hospital/social services or purchased privately direct from source.

Central vision is more sensitive to colour vision, whereas peripheral cells are more tuned to black and white so night time can be an issue as well as black and white images, filters and adequate lighting are key to successfully using functional retained/residual vision.

There are many support groups and networks for either people living with low vision or specifically glaucoma. These are excellent resources as no one can understand the challenges and how to overcome them better than someone who also has the condition. You cannot learn that form of experience through reading.

Modern technology is always producing new and exciting low vision aids, some which we couldn't have imagined possible one generation ago. If you know someone with low vision needs, there are yearly shows put on in places like the NEC where the latest tech is on show to trial and see if it may be of benefit.


 Learn More 

Lets talk about Macular degeneration

Posted on 04 February 2021


Lets talk about Macular degeneration
Lets talk about Macular degeneration
Lets talk about Macular degeneration

February is Low vision awareness month, Let's talk about Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is the most common cause of sight loss in people over the age of 50 in the UK. It is sometimes referred to as age-related macular degeneration or AMD or ARMD. There can be quite a bit of confusion cause about treatments for this condition especially from newspapers as there are 2 subtypes and the most common type has few treatment options.

What is the macula?

The macula is part of the retina at the back of the eye. It is only about 5mm across but is responsible for our central vision, most of our colour vision and the fine detail of what we see. The macula has a very high concentration of photoreceptor cells – the cells that detect light. They send signals to the brain, which interprets them as images. The rest of the retina processes our peripheral, or side vision.

What causes AMD?

There are 2 types of macular degeneration Dry and Wet. Dry is the most common making up over 90% of cases.

Dry AMD

Dry AMD is a slow deterioration of the cells of the macula, often over many years, as the retinal cells die off and are not renewed. The term ‘dry’ does not mean the person has dry eyes, just that the condition is not wet AMD.
The progression of dry AMD varies, but people often carry on as normal for some time.

Wet AMD

Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) develops when abnormal blood vessels grow into the macula. These vessels are weak and leak blood or fluid which leads to scarring of the macula and rapid loss of central vision. Wet AMD can develop very suddenly, but it can now be treated if caught quickly. Fast referral to a hospital specialist is essential.
A person with dry AMD can also develop wet AMD which is treatable, so it is important to act on changes in vision.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms for both wet and dry AMD are similar although in wet AMD the symptoms occur quickly and are more severe with Dry occurring over a long period of time and going undetected or mistaken for general blurring of vision often assuming that a change in spectacles is needed.
The most commonly appreciated symptoms are:
• Gaps or dark spots (like a smudge on glasses) may appear in your vision, especially first thing in the morning. Objects in front of you might change shape, size or colour or seem to move or disappear.
• Colours can fade.
• You may find bright light glaring and uncomfortable or find it difficult to adapt when moving from dark to light environments.
• Words might disappear when you are reading.
• Straight lines such as door frames and lampposts may appear distorted or bent.

What causes AMD/risk factors?
• Age
• Family History of AMD
• Smoking
• Weight
• Exposure to UV (sun)
• High Blood pressure

Diagnosing AMD

AMD can be diagnosed by your Optometrist during routine or emergency sight testing.
In all sight tests we not only test for spectacle prescriptions but most importantly we look at the eyes health. There are parts of the eye which cannot be seen easily but the macular is positioned centrally so is a more easily assessed part of the eye. Sometimes however dilating eye drops are needed so that the bright light we use to view inside the eye stop your pupil from going small (the body’s normal, involuntary response to viewing bright lights)
As these changes often occur deep within the back of the eye viewing alone may not be enough to see changes occur and additional tests are needed such as OCT (Ocular coherence tomography) which can either be done at Hospital by referral or at some branches for an additional fee of £40.

OCT is also a good for providing your optometrist with a bench mark reading to look back on if changes in vision occur.

Treatment for AMD

There is no medical treatment for dry AMD, there are many research projects going on to find treatments or cures which you may read about in the news.
Several drugs are used to treat wet AMD. They are known as ‘anti-VEGF’ drugs. VEGF stands for ‘vascular endothelial growth factor’. It is the substance in the body that is responsible for the development of healthy blood vessels. In wet AMD, too much VEGF is produced in the eye, causing the growth of unwanted, unhealthy blood vessels.

Anti-VEGF drugs block the production of VEGF and stop the development of abnormal blood vessels. All the anti-VEGF drugs are given as an injection into the eye.
Lucentis® was the first anti-VEGF to be licensed for wet AMD. The normal procedure is that all patients receive a standard ‘loading dosage’ at the start of their treatment: normally three or more consecutive monthly injections. Eylea®.is another medication used but usually used for patients expected to be needing injections for longer as the interval between doses is increased and provided in non-consecutive months.

In December 2020, NICE (national institute of clinical excellence) announced that Beovu® had been approved to treat wet AMD. This new anti-VEGF treatment is longer-acting than the current treatments, and needs to be injected only around every 12 weeks. Patients who react well to the drug could have their injections spaced even further apart.

After this initial phase, there are a number of treatment regimens that an ophthalmologist can choose. Each regimen has a subtle difference in the frequency of appointments. They also vary as to whether or not you have an injection at every appointment.

Non medical treatments

Spectacles focus the light onto the macula as this is the most sensitive part of the eye, when damaged the peripheral vision becomes the most functional area of vision. Some people benefit from extra magnification for near as this makes the image falling on the back of the eye larger than the macular therefore falling on the functional part of the eye. Usually however people develop an enhanced use peripheral/eccentric fixation techniques, this technique requires someone to look away from or not directly at an object so it can be seen in their peripheral vision.

Hold out your hand and look straight at a finger, you can see the finger you are staring at in great detail. This is macula detail. While staring at the same finger notice the other fingers but do not look towards them, the detail isn’t as sharp but still functional. This is peripheral vision and falling on the retina.
There are now spectacles that force the image to fall onto a person’s best area of peripheral vision for them by looking straight ahead.

The peripheral area of the back of the eye is more sensitive to black and white vision rather than anything with colour. Yellow tints on spectacles can help to reduce colour perception and encourage black and white vision. For the same reason it is best that devices used around the house settings are adjusted to black and white mode like phones and televisions.

Making objects bigger can also help (magnification). Eg television; This can be done by moving televisions closer, investing in a bigger screen or by using low vision aids like magnifiers. The same principle applies to other objects.
There are many other low vision aids that can assist a person with sight loss for all manner of tasks such as whistles to alert you when pouring a cup of tea and stickers that can be applied to a cooker for finding popular heat settings. These can be purchased privately or available through low vision clinics.

An Ophthalmologist can refer patients to low vision clinics where expensive magnifiers and low vision aids can be loaned out to people after proper assessment to determine which powers or techniques will suit a person best.
There are also many support groups such as macular society as well as local support groups where people can share their experiences and assist people with suggestions.

Our dispensing opticians at every practice are trained in assisting patients learning eccentric or peripheral viewing techniques. The area which is best for each person is unique to them so must be found by trial and error. There are some things we can do with spectacles but we unfortunately will not be able to provide the improvements people desire from memory of corrected sight with glasses.

I hope this blog will be useful and if there is one takeaway point I would say is act quickly if you or someone you know mentions a loss in vision, swift action can lead to a better prognosis. We are open throughout the covid pandemic and beyond providing emergency and routine sight tests.


 Learn More 

Special delivery! We will deliver your solutions

Posted on 03 February 2021


Special delivery! We will deliver your solutions

Are you one of the thousands of patients who use wetting drops for dry eye conditions?

If so we are happy to deliver these products to you.

We stock many different products including Theloz, Hyabak, Hycosan, Systane, Blepha Range, Viscotears, Tears natural and eye mist spray.

We are also able to supply anti-fog, cleaning and contact lens solutions.

Free delivery on orders over £20. Call your local practice and they will be able to take payment over the phone and get them sent out to you.


 Learn More 

Lockdown 3.0, We are here for you.

Posted on 06 January 2021


Lockdown 3.0, We are here for you.

With another lockdown starting 2021 we are not having the start to 2021 we had wished for.

Never the less we are here all your eyecare needs.
Opticians are classed as an essential service so we are providing the following services:

• Emergency Eyecare, by telephone with one of our opticians or face to face if necessary.
• Eye tests if you feel your vision has changed or you are in need of new spectacles.
• Contact lens fittings, trials and aftercare
• Spectacle, supply, repair and adjustment
• Contact Lens supply
• Online booking now available to avoid coming into practice to book.
• Hearing Services

If you are clinically vulnerable or shielding, call your practice to see if we can offer any remote services. We will do what we can during these difficult times.


 Learn More 

Santa does specs and so much more.......

Posted on 01 December 2020


Santa does specs and so much more.......

Santa does specs…. And so much more?

Santa doesn’t just deliver toys, clothes and gadgets to the boys and girls on his nice list. This year he has loads of optical accessories and sunglasses for even those on the naughty list.
Rather than the usual box of chocolates as a stocking filler how about a jewellery glasses chain, novelty or patterned glasses case or antifog sprays cloths and wipes with options starting from £2.99.

And its not just the stocking fillers he can bring, for the bigger gifts, how about specialist sports specs like Oakley prizm for the golfer, cyclist, angler or skier of the house.

We even have things for those on the naughty list, like vouchers so Uncle Dominic can get his eyes tested properly rather than having to rely on looking at castles.

Follow our Facebook page for our Christmas competitions for a change to win some new sunglasses and office varifocals.


Merry Christmas all.


 Learn More 

Children face undetected visual problems due to Covid 19

Posted on 19 November 2020


Children face undetected visual problems due to Covid 19

THOUSANDS OF CHILDREN FACE UNDETECTED VISUAL PROBLEMS DUE TO COVID-19.

Did your child start primary school in 2019/2020? They may not be getting their sight tested like the year groups before them.

The brain develops visual function until the age of 7years. Screening a child in reception can detect issues with visual development which can still be corrected in time to achieve normal levels of sight. With Covid 19 closing schools in March and only reopening this September the screening program for 2019 intake had barely begun. Children in this year’s intake will not start to have their screening until the last years test have been complete, but, with sudden year group closures this backlog is only going to increase.

Like with many other services will they catch up? Will they do so with enough time to effectively treat those in need of referral? Or will they have to effectively forget a whole intake in order to start again?

BACKGOUND TO VISION SCREENING IN THE UK.

Children’s vision screening in the UK has for a long time now been a postcode lottery. Depending on where the schools are located, determines whether or not a screening program is funded in that area.
Currently Orthoptists lead this program. An Orthoptist specialises in visual development and how the eyes work together as a pair (Binocular vision). Unfortunately it’s a case of funding. An Orthoptist doing a vision screening is an expensive service and some areas the local NHS governance will not fund it.

At present the options are Orthoptists providing the tests or nothing, despite other professions being more than capable with a little additional training.
Luckily in the areas our practices fall under, screening services are available.

OUR MISSION

Firstly this issue is being discussed between the optical professions but no one is informing the parents of these children screening will not be taking place nor is it communicated to parents of children in none funded areas that their children will not have a sight test at school. By being aware you can have the opportunity to act.

We want to make all parents aware of the importance of detecting sight issues early in children. Not only can poor eye sight impact education but also if not corrected early enough, lower the potential levels of vision when older. Furthermore some vision defects are difficult to detect such as when vision is only reduced in one eye. In this case the child would be able to detect small objects with both eyes open leading to parents falsely assuming all is ok when in reality only one eye is seeing so well.

Although the vision function develops by the age of 7 years the eye is a focusing system and it can change throughout childhood, teen years and into adulthood. It generally settles down by your early 20’s and starts to change again as we enter 40’s. Yearly sight test are recommended until at least 16 years old.

Sight tests are free at any NHS registered opticians which we are as well as others. If concerned in anyway or even just to confirm sight is developing as well as you suspect you do not have to wait for your child to be screened at school. Book them in for a sight test.


 Learn More 

November: Diabetic Eye Disease month, what you need to know.

Posted on 14 November 2020


November: Diabetic Eye Disease month, what you need to know.
November: Diabetic Eye Disease month, what you need to know.

Being diagnosed with diabetes can be a life-changing event, and it can be challenging to come to terms with at first. However, you must understand the health risks that can come with being diabetic. Diabetes can cause health complications in other areas of the body, including your eyes.

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of preventable sight loss in the UK. By recognising the signs of the eye conditions associated with diabetes, you can prevent future problems with your vision and eye health.

WHAT EFFECT DOES DIABETES HAVE ON YOUR EYES?

The changes in your blood sugar levels, caused by diabetes, can often affect many parts of your body and how you feel, this includes the lens inside your eye. Changes in your blood sugar levels can make your vision blurry, this can change throughout the day and even day to day as your levels fluctuate.

If you have diabetes, you might also be at higher risk of certain eye conditions when compared to others without diabetes; this can include cataracts, glaucoma and retinopathy.

CATARACTS AND DIABETES

Cataracts are a common eye condition in people aged 65 or over and usually develop gradually over the years. As diabetes can affect the lens of your eye, being diabetic can increase your chances of developing cataracts. You may find that you contract cataracts at an earlier age than expected.

When you have cataracts, the lens in your eye gradually becomes cloudy and impairs your vision. It is not painful, but it can cause symptoms like blurry vision, faded colours, double vision, or seeing a halo effect when looking at lights.

You can undergo cataract surgery to fix this, which is a very straightforward operation. It is one of the most common procedures in the UK.

GLAUCOMA AND DIABETES

If you have diabetes, you may be more likely to develop glaucoma. Glaucoma happens when there is a build-up of pressure in the eye, which can lead to damage around the retina or optic nerve if not treated.

Symptoms of glaucoma are not always noticeable but can include eye pain, redness, headaches and misty vision. Those with diabetes have a higher risk of developing glaucoma, but it can be easily treated if found early enough.

DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

Diabetic retinopathy is directly related to diabetes and occurs when there is damage to the blood vessels in the eye. Over time, diabetes can affect the blood vessels supplying the retina of your eye due to high blood sugar levels, affecting how it works. There are different types of retinopathy, with each type progressing in stages.

Diabetic retinopathy doesn’t usually present noticeable symptoms because the condition is gradual. If you have had diabetes for a long time, or your blood sugar levels and blood pressure are high, you can be at higher risk.

Treatment is available for diabetic retinopathy, with several different options depending on which stage the condition has reached. Your eye care professional will be able to advise on a case by case basis.

REDUCING YOUR RISK OF EYE DISEASE IF YOU HAVE DIABETES

The most important thing you can do to protect your overall health is to keep your diabetes under control as best you can to reduce your risk of many different health complications, including eye diseases. You should closely monitor your blood sugar levels, blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Maintaining a healthy weight and keeping fit is also essential to reduce your risk of eye disease. Poor diet and other similar lifestyle choices can trigger many eye conditions. Quitting smoking, or not taking up smoking in the first place, is also very important for everyone’s health but particularly if you have diabetes. Smoking can increase your blood pressure and may raise your blood sugar levels.

If you have diabetes, the NHS offers an annual diabetic eye screening service for those aged 12 and above as well as free sight tests on either an annual or biannual basis depending on your age or health of your eyes. It is crucial that you attend regular sight test appointments as well as going to your screening, as they can detect diabetic retinopathy in your eyes before your vision is affected.
The screening DOES NOT look for any other issues with your eyes such as Glasses prescriptions, Corneal health, Macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataracts aswell as many more. In a nut shell that service are only looking for diabetic changes. We are able to offer screening in our non Staffordshire practices, sadly the funding for Opticians to perform screenings in Staffordshire has ended so you will be called to a mobile screening location and given a designated date and time if you are registered with a GP in this area.

Covid 19 has had an effect on Diabetic screening creating a large backlog. The diabetic services have looked at historic data to see which patients have consistent healthy screenings and as a one off due to pandemic these patients will skip a year and be seen in 2021. Any new diabetics or people with historic issues who are being monitored more carefully will still be seen.
If you have diabetes and have noticed a change in your vision you should not wait for your screening, its most likely a change in prescription but it could be something more serious, book a free sight test to make sure.


 Learn More 

Halloween; Watch out, there is an eye infection out!

Posted on 01 October 2020


Halloween; Watch out, there is an eye infection out!

Halloween fancy dress is a growing phenomenon that has spread from the USA so that we are now having more and more spooky parties and ghostly gatherings on 31st October. Of course it is fun to dress up and get involved and you may have thought about complementing your outfit with novelty contact lenses.

However, don’t get tempted to buy lenses from a fancy dress shop or online as you will be taking sight threatening risks. You will have no idea about the lens quality not to mention whether they will fit your eyes or not. It is actually illegal for joke shops and fancy dress shops to sell contact lenses at all in this country as they can only be sold under the supervision of a registered professional – that means an Optometrist, Contact Lens Optician or a suitably qualified doctor such an Ophthalmologist. This is for your protection so that your eyes can be assessed for their suitability to wear contact lenses (even if it’s just for a party or two!) and so that appropriate, well-fitting lenses will be supplied. In addition, you will get all the help you need with handling and hygiene carefully explained so that you know how to minimise any risk of infection.

Poor quality or badly fitting contact lenses can scratch your eyes or cause infections – and this can be sight threatening. If you have not been taught how to look after and wear lenses this can also lead to a scary eye problem because bacteria in poorly cared for lenses can also cause disease.

Every year within a few days of Halloween, stories turn up in the press of unfortunate ghouls and witches who have ended up in eye casualty – and in some cases they have ultimately lost vision due to their contact lens catastrophe.

Colin Lee & Jenks Opticians always supply well-fitting contact lenses and give you that support and clinical expertise.



So don’t end up in a graveyard of eyeball despair - be a wise witch or a smart sorcerer – and only buy lenses from registered opticians!!


 Learn More 

Priority No1: What we are doing to keep you safe.

Posted on 30 September 2020


Priority No1: What we are doing to keep you safe.
Priority No1: What we are doing to keep you safe.

The world is a very different place than it was this time last year, when none of us had even heard of Coronavirus (Ahh the good old days)

We were offering emergency eye care throughout the lockdown, repairing specs from our cars, delivering contact lenses to doors and doing video consultations as well as face to face appointments when necessary.
No one wants another lockdown and even during local lockdowns our measures are in place to keep you safe and us open.

So here's what measures we have in place to keep you safe:

1. PPE (lots of it)
All our staff are kitted out with full PPE to be worn when in contact with our patients, this includes, face shields, masks, gloves and aprons.

2. Hand washing
We have hand gel stations all over the practices and we are asking all patients to wash their hands upon entering, remember you may have washed your hands when leaving the last shop you were in but you have touched a handle to come in since.
If you are sensitive to hand gel you are more than welcome to use one of our sinks to use soap and water or we will provide you with a pair of latex free gloves whilst inside.

3. Protective screens
We have screens placed over all of our desks in practice so that we are keeping you as safe as possible. It also gives our staff an area to enjoy a break from wearing the face shields all day.

4. Social distancing
We are limiting the number of people who can come in to practice so that we can ensure social distancing is maintained. This means we are booking appointments for collections, adjustments, fittings etc wherever possible. Its not to say we cant see you without an appointment but we may have to ask you to wait outside if there are too many people inside at that time.

5. Clean, Clean and Clean some more
We are cleaning everything you may come in touch with continuously throughout the day; chairs, desks, pens you name it we are cleaning it after every contact.
Inside the testing room we have always followed strict cleaning routines on chin rests etc but we have stepped this up also to include all furnishings.
With frames we have stopped patients trying any on without supervision, this means that we can keep any worn to one side where we are cleaning them with an approved cleaning agent which doesn’t age or fade the frames unlike alcohol based cleaners.

Rest assured, no matter what happens in our local areas, its safe to visit us. After all our sight is precious, let us look after it.


 Learn More 

Fed up of fog? Anti fog solutions

Posted on 29 September 2020


Blog for anti fog solutions in eyewear

Face masks have become an essential part of daily life to help reduce the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19), but they affect our specs and therefore sight by steaming up the lenses and the warm air moves towards the eyes causing increased drying of the tears, so much so that researchers have given this the name (MADE) mask-associated dry eye.

As the weather changes, going from the cold to the warm of indoor heating will make these issues worse.

There are solutions to help these issues and we are at hand to go through them when you come in and visit. We champion ourselves on lifestyle dispensing, getting to know our patients and offer them the best options based on their lifestyle and daily activity needs.
In this new normal we need to think; How often do you need to wear a mask daily? For some we might just wear them when we pop to the shops but for others they could be wearing masks for hours every day while at work. Have you noticed your eyes have been more prone to feeling dry and gritty after or while wearing a mask? After all if our eyes are dry we are more likely to rub them which is an increase infection risk of Covid 19. By keeping the eyes comfortable it keeps hands away.

So what are the options?

1. Anti-fog lens treatments

An anti-fog coating can be applied to the lens itself. These coatings can have the same benefits of anti-glare and scratch resistance as well as improved resilience against fogging up. We have tested these products and there was a marked improvement compared to normal coated and uncoated lenses. We have made a video to demonstrate these lenses which can be found here https://youtu.be/wgGW9uUffXI

We are offering these coatings at the same cost as our premium anti-glare lenses, offering the same benefits of anti-glare and a scratch warranty but with the anti fog as a free upgrade.

2. Anti-fog cleaning products

If you already have specs and don’t wish to change the lenses then there are specialist cloths and wipes which apply an anti-fog treatment to the lenses which lasts up to a few days. They come in the form of cloths and pre-soaked individual wipes. Some work best with anti-glare lenses while others are best suited to uncoated lenses.

We have trialled over the past few months and have found which we feel work best.
These can be found in all our practices with options starting from 0.50p.

Here's a video we made trialling the options https://youtu.be/TmVMxozsINc

3. Contact lenses

Contact lenses are another great way of avoiding specs from steaming up because, well, you’re now wearing any.
Modern contact lenses such as Silicon Hydrogel are very efficient at keeping the eye moist while also allowing enough Oxygen to the eye so it stays healthy.

We offer a free contact lens trial service so you could see how you could benefit from wearing them whilst wearing masks as well as other PPE.

4. Dry eye services

If since wearing a mask for prolonged periods of time you have found that your eyes are prone to drying or are feeling uncomfortable we have the solutions for you.
Each practice has trained ocular hygienists who can discuss the wetting drop product ranges we sell and explain each ones differences and benefits.

Not all wetting drops are equal, cheap ones often dry out much quicker so need applying more often meaning you go through the bottle quicker and it actually ends up costing you more. Likewise some bottles you may find difficult to use so the drops rarely go into the eye meaning again you waste unnecessary money with the drops on your cheek instead of the eye (we call them expensive tears)

If you are one of those who is unfortunately effected by dry eye and masks are making the situation worse we offer a dry eye clinic where a trained optician can identify the exact cause of why the eyes are dry and create a bespoke treatment plan for you.
There are many causes for dry eye and what works well for one doesn’t often work for another so friends/family advice may be wrong for you.
The price includes 2 follow up appointments to see how the treatment is going as well as discount off any products such as drops or lid cleaning wipes.

This service costs £40 and is available at all of our practices.

Give us a call if you would like any further advice. During this period of time with social distancing measures we are only able to let a limited number of patients in at any one time so we are making booking consultations to avoid disappointment or having to wait in the cold.


 Learn More 

We are open, click here for more info

Posted on 04 July 2020


Open for business

There is a member of our team now present Monday to Saturday at all of our practices.

We have resumed sight tests but as you can imagine we have a large list of people who have been waiting during the lockdown, please bare with us. If you are due your routine test with no symptoms and do not need any new specs please await your reminder letter when things have settled down.

As we have throughout the lockdown, if you have an urgent problem we will see you straight away. Please be aware that we are not able to test everyday of the week though and if you are unable to leave the house we can offer virtual consultations.

If you feel you have had a change in your vision and you would like to purchase some specs from us, please call your local practice and we will update you on availability and get you booked in.

We are still operating with a limited number of staff so if you ring and we dont answer, we are there, leave a message if you can or alternatively you can email your practice with the details on the website.

The optical governing bodies have deemed that 2m distancing should still be maintained in optical practices, we will be wearing facemasks and we ask that you do the same. We are cleaning continuously throughout the day to keep you safe when entering our practices. Screens are in place throughout and we ask that you pay only by card.

We saw many of our own patients in need during the lockdown aswell as countless from other practices who had closed. Jan, Helen, Clive, Kim, Mike and Ben worked tirelessly to help those in need over the past few months and we look forward to seeing you back in more normal surroundings.


 Learn More 

Covid 19 outbreak, eyecare, service and support

Posted on 15 April 2020


Covid 19 outbreak, eyecare, service and support

We are already in a period of deeply uncharted territory.
During this period we will be operating on an emergency basis.
Please bare with us during this time, the practices are closed but we are able to offer essential and urgent eye care advice and support.

This includes if:

Your vision has suddenly changed or become blurry
You have a painful or red eye
You have been advised to attend this practice by 111 or another healthcare professional for urgent eye care
You have broken or lost your specs and need a replacement pair to function
You have a problem with your contact lenses
You need a supply of contact lenses

Please phone your usual practice telephone number, your call will be answered by one of our optician’s who can assess how we are best to meet your needs. See locations on the main menu to direct you to your local practice details including telephone numbers.

Contact lens supply for existing patients will be done by post/delivery.

If you have spectacles on order we will be able to post/deliver these to you.

If you are worried about your eyes please phone us to discuss this. We may be able to answer your queries over the phone or video without you needing to come in.

Stay safe and we hope to see you very soon, in person and less than 2 meters away!


 Learn More 

Easter Bank Holiday opening dates, Click for more info

Posted on 09 April 2020


Easter Bank Holiday opening dates, Click for more info

Happy Easter folks!
Thank you for all your support during this difficult time. We hope you have a great Easter.
We will be closed from Good Friday 10/4/20 and reopen Tuesday the 14/4/20 resuming our emergency eye care service.
If you have any emergency eye care needs over these dates please call 111 and they will advise you on the best course of action.


 Learn More 

Coronavirus update & emergency services.

Posted on 24 March 2020


Coronavirus update & emergency services.

Hello all,

We are already in a period of deeply uncharted territory.
During this period we will be operating on an emergency basis.
Until Saturday 28th March, a member of staff will be present during normal working hours at each practice.

After that the practices will be closed BUT We are able to offer essential and urgent eye care advice and support.

This includes if:

Your vision has suddenly changed or become blurry
You have a painful or red eye
You have been advised to attend this practice by 111 or another healthcare professional for urgent eye care
You have broken or lost your specs and need a replacement pair to function
You have a problem with your contact lenses
You need a supply of contact lenses

Please phone your usual practice telephone number, your call will be answered by one of our optician’s who can assess how we are best to meet your needs. See locations on the main menu to direct you to your local practice details including telephone numbers.

Contact lens supply for existing patients will be done by post/delivery.

If you have spectacles on order we will be able to post/deliver these to you.

If you are worried about your eyes please phone us to discuss this. We may be able to answer your queries over the phone or video without you needing to come in.

Stay safe and we hope to see you very soon, in person and less than 2 meters away!


 Learn More 

Coronavirus advice and guidance

Posted on 20 March 2020


Coronavirus advice and guidance

Were open but for the safety of our patients and colleagues we are following strict government guidelines

We recognise that these are exceptional and unsettling times and want to support you with the latest information on our practices as well as advice on how to try and protect ourselves from the Coronavirus

As a health care provider, we always strive to deliver the highest clinical and hygiene standards, including regular handwashing and cleaning equipment between patients. But, given the threat we are all facing from COVID-19, we have brought in some new measures to try and combat the spread of the virus:

· Following government guidance, we’re asking anyone with flu-like symptoms not to visit us. When our patients are feeling better, we’ll help them rebook their appointment and look forward to welcoming them back in-practice


· We’ve made hand sanitisers available to colleagues and patients in our practices. Hand washing remains the best form so the facility to do so will be offered if you prefer to not use gel.


· Disinfectant wipes are available throughout the practice to wipe down any frames that you with to try on before and after use.


· Frames will also be cleaned at regular intervals during the day


· We have re-arranged the waiting area seating (where possible) to make sure there is less close contact between customers. This may mean the chairs in our waiting areas are spaced further apart than normal or every other desk will be left free when measuring and fitting glasses and contact lenses for our customer

What should i do regarding my Contact lenses and Glasses wear during this time?

The average person touches their face more than 20 times an hour* and half the time probably isn’t even aware they’re doing it. Safe to say, it’s a difficult challenge for everyone.

On top of that, glasses and contact lens wearers have the extra struggle of having to cope with physically wearing something on their faces or in their eyes and having to fit them on a regular basis.

Glasses

Will my normal glasses cleaning liquid help to protect my glasses from picking up the virus?

Just like washing your hands, it’s good practice to clean your glasses regularly. A glasses cleaning solution that contains a surfactant will help to remove surface microbes that may be of harm. Make sure you clean them thoroughly, not forgetting the nose pads and sides, and dry them with a clean glasses cleaning cloth.

Can I help keep my glasses virus-free by using anti-bacterial hand sanitiser on them, will that do the job?

An anti-bacterial hand sanitiser will help to rid your glasses of potentially harmful surface particles, as it would your hands. But, do avoid contact with your glasses’ lenses, as some ingredients may affect the quality of the lens’ surface. It’s also likely to smear or leave streaks on your lenses unless properly rinsed and dried. If you have purchased your glasses from us, pop into your nearest practice and ask for a complimentary lens spray, these can be refilled for free when it runs out!


How often should I wash my glasses cleaning cloth and how should I do it?

With regular wiping, it doesn’t take long for a cleaning cloth to get a little dirty. The simplest way to keep it clean is to wash it in the washing machine on a 40 degree wash with your clothes. I tend to wash my cloth once a week or more frequently if needed. Overtime, and after frequent washes, your cloth may shrink a little, become less effective and need replacing.


If I run out of glasses cleaning liquid, can I use something else?

Yes you can. You can wash your glasses in warm diluted soapy water, a pH neutral washing up liquid is ideal. Make sure you rinse them thoroughly under running water and use a clean glasses cleaning cloth to dry to help avoid any smears or streaks on your lenses.

Contact Lenses

Should I avoid wearing contact lenses so I don’t have to touch my face?

No, you don’t need to. Wearing contact lenses is safe despite myths and misinformation that you may have heard or read about recently. What’s critical though is that you wash your hands carefully and thoroughly with soap and water followed by drying them with unused paper towels. You should do this when you’re putting your lenses in your eyes and also removing them.


Should I use an anti-bacterial hand sanitiser before I handle my lenses or is soap a better option?

As you’ll probably already know, The World Health Organisation are advising people to wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after they have been in a public place, or after blowing their nose, coughing or sneezing.

If I normally wear monthly lenses, should I switch to dailies so I’m not handling my lenses as much?

Irrespective of whether you’re wearing monthly or daily disposable lenses, they’ll still need to be inserted and removed from your eyes at least once each day. Again, proper handwashing is the key. You should dispose of your daily disposable lenses each evening, or regularly disinfect your monthly or two-week lenses according to the instructions you’ve received from your optician or the lens manufacturer.


If I stick with my monthlies, should I change my cleaning pot more regularly?

We already advise that you replace your case every month and we’d suggest you continue to do this. Remember, each night you should empty your case of the old solution; rinse your case with fresh solution and then air-dry it upside down on a clean tissue.


Should I wear surgical gloves when putting my contact lenses in and taking them out, will that make a difference?

As long as you’re washing your hands properly with soap and water before you insert or remove your lenses and dry your hands with unused paper towels, there’s no need to wear gloves. (it’s actually pretty tricky to handle your lenses with them on, so best to avoid it!)


Should I stop using my comfort drops for dry eyes to avoid touching my face?

No. If you’re already using comfort drops you should continue to and make sure you’re thoroughly washing your hands before putting the drops in your eyes. Reducing or stopping using comfort drops could lead to an increase in eye irritation which could increase how often you inadvertently rub your eyes.

Eye Health

Should I watch out for any changing conditions of my eyes and sight that might mean I have contracted the Coronavirus?

Viral Conjunctivitis (pink eye) is believed to occur in about 1-3% of people infected with the Coronavirus so you’re much more likely to have common signs and symptoms such as coughing and a fever.


 Learn More 

And the winner is...................

Posted on 23 January 2020


And the winner is ..........
And the winner is ..........


This weekend we celebrated Christmas in Lieu at Burntwood Rugby club. Our annual (January) Christmas do was, as always a great evening. We had a 2019 Quiz of the year and a game identifying celebs in specs before dancing the night away.
Its at our annual get together where we name our practice of the year. A lot of factors go into the award and this year our Rugeley team won. Huge congratulations to them.

Its also at these events that we reward years of service, and this year was a big one with many people getting recognition.
We celebrated 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 year service anniversary’s this year. This continuity and loyalty is one of the factors we are most proud of as employers, And from a service point of view it means that year on year you will see the same smiling faces when it comes to paying us a visit.

Going to any health check-up can be a daunting experience with many experiencing “white coat” syndrome, so knowing who you will see when you come in can make all the difference. We will even make you a cup of tea to settle your nerves.


 Learn More 

Autumn/Winter driving conditions, what can be done to help your sight?

Posted on 19 October 2019


Autumn/Winter driving conditions, what can be done to help your sight?
Autumn/Winter driving conditions, what can be done to help your sight?
Autumn/Winter driving conditions, what can be done to help your sight?
Autumn/Winter driving conditions, what can be done to help your sight?

Autumn is in full swing and what comes with it are some of the most challenging driving conditions where sight is concerned.
If you’re not driving to work in the dark, you will be faced with very low sun and lots of road surface reflections which are worse still in the rain.
What that means for your eyes is either dark driving conditions with headlights, or low sun and glare from the road.

So what can be done to help you with these conditions?

1) Make sure your sight is corrected, best as can be.
In 2018 over 3000 road collisions in the UK involved a driver with vision below the driving limit. Some with vision that couldn’t be improved by wearing spectacles but there are so many drivers who vision could and should be improved to a good and safe level for driving.

There are thousands of drivers out there this very moment in the UK who are within the driving limits but who could see much sharper. Why settle for ok when you could have HD correction.
Even more worryingly there are many out there who fall below the driving level, who can be corrected by specs who choose not to be putting theirs and other road users safety in jeopardy. Police in the Midlands and Staffordshire have been given increased powers to stop and test people’s sight at the roadside, revoking licences on the spot if you fail to see the licence plate from 20m away.

Some individuals are aware that their vision is not good enough for driving and choose to drive anyway, but many are completely unaware that they no longer meet the vision driving requirements, often because their vision has deteriorated slowly with time, which can be more difficult to detect. This teamed with a low awareness of the visual standard to read a number plate at 20 meters away on a clear day, leads to individuals driving illegally. A recent study found that 50% of Optometrists had come across one or more individuals that knew they not meet the driving standard, but said they would continue to drive anyway, during a one month period.
One of these people may be a friend or relative of yours. Many have glasses but won’t wear them others may not have had a test in years. It’s important to educate these people in the importance of correcting their sight when driving, it could save a life.

If you haven't had a sight test in the last 2 years, get yourself checked out.

2) Keep you windows and mirrors clean
By keeping your windows and windscreen clean, you can avoid extra glare and condensation. This is especially prevalent in Winter, with the falling leaves and debris. Dirty mirrors can reflect and distort light so keeping them clean is essential to a safe drive. If it has been raining, then make sure you give them a wipe, so the droplets don’t further disrupt your vision.

3) Polarised sunglasses
Sunglasses are a key item all people should have. But if you are a driver, make sure they are polarised. Ordinary sunglasses only protect and relieve your eyes from the brightness of the sun, polarised lenses also eliminate glare that reflects off the road surface and dashboard. Polarised lenses are available as a second pair from £50.

4) Coatings and coloured filters.
Lens manufacturers spend a lot of money in research and development of new coatings and tints which may improve a patient’s lifestyle. Driving coatings and tints are a big part of this development especially as headlight brightness and colour has changed with the introduction of a bluer based LED bulb.
In a nutshell a yellow filter helps with the brightness and colour of this LED bulb.
You may have seen some adverts selling yellow driving lenses or clip on’s. Sadly the vast majority of these are illegal for night driving in the UK as they leave you unable to see certain colours and therefore miss hazards on the roads.
Lens manufacturers have managed to create a coating which gives this yellowing and therefore dampening effect to the brightness of headlights while still giving you clarity of other colours, making them safe for night driving.
These coatings can be applied to single vision and Varifocal lenses.
However for some the yellowing can be a hindrance when not driving so they are more suitable as a second pair for specialist use when driving.

5) Transitions XTRActive
Normal photochromic lenses react when UV light hits the surface of the lens causing a change in the molecules meaning the lens goes from clear to tinted. The problem in a car is that most of the UV is reflected off the windscreen meaning they react poorly inside a car.
Transitions XTRActive work differently meaning they react and adapt to the levels of light you experience whilst driving and even leave a mild tint to help with unwanted headlight glare when clear whilst conditions are dark outside. This type of treatment can now be applied to the majority of lens types.

6) Driving Varifocals
There are now specialist varifocals for use when driving. Rather than the conventional design of a varifocal where the narrowest field of view is the intermediate range (the distance at which the speed dials etc sits), a driving varifocal gives an extra wide distance field of view and a much wider intermediate range, sacrificing the near distance area which is not needed when driving.
These again are best served as a second pair as not having the near area may be a hindrance to everyday life.

7) Don’t look directly into the lights
Headlights when directly looked at leave an after image for several seconds on the retina making it difficult to re adjust to the dark road. Avert your gaze keeping your eyes focused down on the road rather than up into the lights.

If you have any questions about lenses which may help you in these conditions call your nearest practice today, where one of our Dispensing Opticians will be happy to discuss our range and offers.


 Learn More 

OCT technology, seeing deeper into the eye.

Posted on 27 July 2019


OCT blog

At Colin Lee Opticians we have always prided ourselves on providing a first class service and leading the way in innovative technologies within eye health care. We were one of the first optical practices to introduce OCT (Ocular Coherence Tomography) technology to the high street a few years ago and we now expanding this tech to more of our practices. This has allowed for earlier detection of many eye conditions including glaucoma and macular degeneration as well as providing peace of mind to patients to patients on NHS waiting lists.

What is OCT and how does it work?

Ocular Coherence Tomography is a non-invasive imaging scan. It is the optical equivalent of ultrasound: ultrasound uses sound waves to bounce of layers of tissue of varying reflectivity to build up an image; OCT works in a similar way. We can then see a cross-sectional image of the retina, thickness measurements are taken and maps formed, which are all important in diagnosing and monitoring eye diseases.
The retina is the light sensitive membrane at the back of the eye that detects images and lets us see – a bit like the film in a camera. With OCT your optometrist can see each of the retina’s distinctive layers enabling earlier detection of many eye conditions.

We all love cake and an iced cake is a great way to think about how OCT works. The top layer of the retina is the icing and without OCT (such as with a microscope or looking into the eye with standard equipment or with retinal photography) we can only see the icing without being able to see inside the cake. Are the layers all even? Is there the right amount of jam, or has it leaked into the sponge? Is there anything hiding in the layers of that cake? Without looking inside the cake, only looking at the icing, you just don’t know. Luckily we don’t need to cut into the cake/eye to find out what is going on in the layers under the surface of the retina as the OCT simply shows us on the screen.

What happens during an OCT appointment?

During an OCT scan you will sit in front of the OCT equipment and rest your head on a support to keep it as still as possible. The camera will then scan your eye, without touching it. You will simply see a few red lines moving around and you will be asked to looks at a green or white dot. Scanning takes about 5 – 10 minutes in total – but most of this time is getting you positioned correctly – the actual scan itself is just a couple of minutes. If you have an OCT scan immediately preceding your eye examination then the optometrist will be able to show you the fascinating images on the screen in the consulting room. Most people don’t require any drops to have the scan either, but the odd few have too small pupils to get a good view so it would be in their
interest to have the drops put in for the quality of the scan.

Why should you have an OCT scan?

OCT scans can identify many more conditions, in addition to glaucoma and macular degeneration (both wet and dry), conditions such as macular holes, macular pucker, macular oedema, central serous retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy & vitreous traction. Many patients choose to have a scan when referral is advised to the Hospital eye clinic, to firstly get answers faster rather than waiting several months for an appointment at the hospital and secondly decrease the For many conditions (and also for routine eye health checking), serial scans give us the most valuable information. If we can build up a number of images over time, it allows us to see if a condition is developing or changing. In addition in detecting disease, serial OCT scans carried out at each eye examination can also give reassurance that healthy eyes are continuing to be perfectly healthy!

We have an OCT at our Aldridge and Tamworth (Jenks) practices so far, so all within easy reach of our other 5 practices.


 Learn More 

Product of the month July 2019 Xperio polarising lenses.

Posted on 06 July 2019


Product of the month July 2019
Product of the month July 2019
Product of the month July 2019
Product of the month July 2019

Colin Lee optician’s product of the month for July is Xperio Polarised lenses.

With the summer in full swing and the holiday seasons approaching you may be looking to invest in a new pair of sunglasses. And a tint is a tint right? Wrong. There are loads of different types of materials and technology out there with a range of optical properties.

My personal favourite are Polarising lenses, but even within this market, they are not all alike with some having more advantages than others.

First of all let’s dispel the Jargon:

What does Polarised/polarising mean?
Light waves travel in many directions. When light waves reflect off of horizontal surfaces such as roads, water or ice they often become concentrated horizontally. This is known as visible glare, which can be uncomfortable for our eyes and potentially dangerous especially when driving as you may miss a hazard. This type of glare is not eliminated by regularly tinted lenses. Lenses with Polarised technology allow only vertical light through the lens and therefore eliminate blinding glare for optimal visual comfort and safety. If your into your fishing you would have already at least heard about this form of lens, rather than see the water like a mirror you see straight into it seeing any of the fish below the surface, oh and rocks you may trip over.
In a nut shell, best lens form for drivers (no glare from road, no reflections of dashboard, anyone who spends time around water, snow or sand.

And what is Xperio?
There are loads of polarising lenses on the market which in a nutshell all block out these horizontal light waves, but when you take light away you lose colour perception and clarity. This is where Xperio differs, this technology enhances colour perception. Xperio Polarised combines the 2 technologies; eliminates harsh, blinding glare and provides a pop, dynamic range of visual experience. This is achieved by improving colour perception and stopping dazzling light to travelling through the lens. Xperio also offers the highest level of UV protection meaning optimum ocular health properties too.

What are they available in?
This technology is available in both single vision (including no power) and various Varifocal designs meaning we can match them to your everyday lenses. The lenses can be made thinner and lighter if your prescription is higher.

There not just available in Grey and Brown colours either, we have loads of colours they can be made in and they can be made with a mirror finish too.

And the best part of all is we are offering a free upgrade to this technology for the rest of the summer. So you pay for a regular tinted pair of lenses and get a free upgrade to Xperio polarised. Not only that we have a very special offer on these lenses if brought as a second pair with discounts of up to 80%.


 Learn More 

Latest technology for detecting Glaucoma- No Puff!

Posted on 18 June 2019


Latest technology for detecting Glaucoma- No Puff!
Latest technology for detecting Glaucoma- No Puff!

Top Tech at Colin Lee Opticians – No puff test for Glaucoma

This week is Glaucoma awareness week, so what better week to discuss what it is and how we at Colin Lee & Jenks Opticians are at the top of our game in detecting it.

Glaucoma is a complicated condition which actually should be called ‘the glaucomas’ as there are many different sub-groups of the disease. Essentially it is a neurodegenerative disease whereby the optic nerve, which is comprised of over a million nerve fibres in each eye, begins to lose nerve fibres at an accelerated rate. This can ultimately cause blindness if not treated. There are many risk factors for glaucoma, with family history and eye pressure being two of the most important. This is why we test adults’ eye pressure each time they come for an eye examination and if you are over 40 and related to a Glaucoma "sufferer", your sight test is free of charge. Approximately 1 person in 50 over the age of 40 has glaucoma, and up to 1 in 10 over the age of 80 but many of these are undiagnosed until there is significant visual loss.

Glaucoma doesn't usually cause any symptoms to begin with. It tends to develop slowly over many years and affects the edges of your vision (peripheral vision) first.

For this reason, many people don't realise they have glaucoma, and it's often only picked up during a routine eye test.

If you do notice any symptoms, they might include blurred vision, or seeing rainbow-coloured circles around bright lights. Both eyes are usually affected, although it may be worse in one eye.

Very occasionally, glaucoma can develop suddenly and cause:

Intense eye pain
Nausea and vomiting
A red eye
A headache
Tenderness around the eyes
Seeing rings around lights
Blurred vision

Here at Colin Lee and Jenks we pride ourselves on keeping up to date with the latest advances in ophthalmic equipment. We were one of the first groups to solely use ‘no-puff’ instruments for checking eye pressures. Testing the eye pressure is important in adults as high eye pressures are one of the main risk factors for developing the eye disease, glaucoma.

The equipment used to measure eye pressure is called a tonometer. The very earliest tonometers involved the patient lying down, and weights being rested on the open eyes – unpleasant for the patient and not without risks! The air-puff tonometers were a huge step forward in tonometer technology but many people found this technique unpleasant and some people would actually avoid having their eyes tested as they disliked the stress caused by waiting so intensely for the dreaded ‘BANG!’ from the machine. In addition, as if that wasn’t bad enough, several readings had to be taken to get an average as the pressure in your eyes varies with the cycle of your heartbeat so one reading is not enough. Some air puffs require 3 readings per eye – but some up to 5.

Because we knew how much patients hated the anxiety-inducing ‘bang!’ from the old air puff instruments, when we came across the gentler ICare tonometers (which were originally developed in Finland) that hardly cause so much as a blink, we knew we had to invest in this. With this new instrumentation all you hear are some digital beeps to indicate the readings being taken, and you may feel a tickling sensation on your eyelashes. No more nasty puffs or bangs to worry about when you come to have an eye examination here!


 Learn More 

Children's eye care awareness

Posted on 06 June 2019


Childrens eye care awareness
Childrens eye care awareness

Having personally specialised in children's eye care for 10 years and recently becoming a father for the first time it only seemed fitting to do our very first blog post on Children's eye care.
Hopefully we can try to educate fellow parents and dispel some myths you may have heard from a friend of a friend.

The first 8 years of life are known as the critical period for sight development. This is the period in a child's life where all visual function develops and when the vision is still in its elastic stage, so any developmental issues can have the potential of being corrected.
This is a “use it or lose it” stage of life where problems which are not dealt with may be irreversible or the potential for treatment success reduced.

Here are some commonly used words associated with sight development:

Amblyopia is the fancy word for a lazy eye, where the eye is healthy but the vision has not developed at the same rate as the other, "good" eye. If detected early and before the end of the critical period, serious differences in vision, between eyes can be reversed.

Strabismus is the fancy word for a squint, where the eye turns in a different direction to the fixing eye. Sometimes these squints can be rectified just by giving the child the spectacles they need. Other times surgery may be needed to rebalance the muscles with one another. Either way the sooner this action is taken the more likely a child’s binocular vision may develop.

When should you get your child’s eyes tested?

Definitely before they start school. What If they can’t see the board? What if their near vision is blurry? All of these things will deter their start in education.
However if you have any concerns ever about a child’s eye sight, you have a family history of childhood eye problems or you think a squint may be present get them seen sooner. These issues are best dealt with before the child is 3 years old.

Many districts run a school screening program run by Orthoptists from the local hospital eye department, where children are tested for vision and binocular vision issues in Reception. However they have a lot of schools to cover within the year and it may be towards the end of the year with some children approaching their 6th birthday when they are seen leaving limited time to treat any issues detected.

What if my child doesn’t know their letters or even isn’t speaking yet?

Your child doesn’t have to know their letters to have an accurate sight test. In fact a child doesn’t even have to speak to have an accurate sight test.

Matching cards and pictures are used for preschool children (see attached picture) and cards with an image on one half are used to observe babies responses (using their inquisitive nature).

Drops can also be used if the responses given are unreliable or inconsistent, the drops mean we can measure for spectacle prescriptions by just using light and moving it across the eye. These drops also make the pupil large so we can have a good look inside the eye.

NHS, children and glasses.

Sight tests are free for any child under the age of 16 and a voucher is issued towards the cost of spectacles if needed. The cost of some children’s glasses will be fully covered under these vouchers.

Top tips.
• New-born’s sight is very blurry and insensitive to colour for the first few months of life so don’t worry if you think they can’t see you from across a room etc. Download an app called “Babysee”. This uses your phones camera to show you what your baby’s sight is like at their current stage of development.
• According to research, Vision is responsible for 80% of all learning in a child’s first 12 years. Having children’s eyes tested before they start school and yearly throughout is therefore recommended to prevent any avoidable obstacles in their education.
• New research shows that the majority of the suns UV exposure and therefore damage occurs in our eyes during childhood. However children who wear sunspecs are as few as 3%. Something to think about for sure!
• All Children’s glasses must be supplied and fitted by a registered Optician in accordance to UK law. We have at least one Dispensing Optician at each of our practices who are the experts in frame and lens selection and fitting.


 Learn More 

Free specs with contact lenses

Posted on 01 February 2019


Free specs with contact lenses

Free specs for contact lenses.
We would like to reward all our new and existing contact lens patients who pay a monthly direct debit with a free pair of spectacles. Choose from a range of over 30 different frames or use the vouchers value towards anything of your choice.
Pop into your local branch to claim your voucher or it will be waiting for you at your next check up.


Single vision included free of charge only, see your local practice for full terms and conditions.


 Learn More 

New designer ranges in store now

Posted on 27 October 2016



New designer ranges in all stores now, featuring RayBan, Police, Armani, Oakley, Carolina Herrera, Diesel, Dolce & Gabbana and Michael Kors


 Learn More 

Mix and match from £79

Posted on 17 September 2016



Mix and match from £79 for 2 pairs of complete spectacles. Choose across any combination of prescription including reading, distance and prescription sunglasses.
Single vision only.


 Learn More 

Free sunspecs with contact lens purchase.

Posted on 30 June 2016



Free sunspecs when setting up a direct debit or purchasing 6 months supply of contact lenses. T& C apply.


 Learn More 

Blog Search

Blog Categories

Offices